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You are here: LAN & WAN LAN & WAN Reviews Ethernet from your TV Outlet: NETGEAR MoCA Coax-Ethernet Adapter Kit Reviewed - Performance - In House Throughput

Ethernet from your TV Outlet: NETGEAR MoCA Coax-Ethernet Adapter Kit Reviewed - Performance - In House Throughput

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Performance - In House Throughput

So with only 3 feet of cable and no RF in the picture, things look pretty promising for getting enough bandwidth for HD streaming through the MoCA adapters. But I now had to see what happened when the MCAs were connected into a home's coax system.

When my home was built, we had RG6 coax home run to a basement utility room along with CAT 5e for data and phone. We don't have access to cable TV, but instead have two DirecTV DVRs—one HD, one SD— that have dedicated dual coax connections back to our dish's multiswitched LNB that run through the utility room path panel.

So the good news is that I could set up a coax connection for the test pretty easily. But the bad was that it wouldn't have any RF involved. But fortunately, I also have an off-the-air (OTA) antenna to receive a (very) few local HD stations.

The antenna line runs from the attic, down to the basement, through a cheapo amplifier that came with the antenna, into the patch panel that then runs the signal up to the HD DVR in the living room. I was able to dig up a two output splitter from my pile o' parts and in no time I had the test setup shown in Figure 15 configured (please excuse the crude drawing). Each of the runs from splitter to MCA has around 50 feet of RG6 coax.

In-house test setup

Figure 15: In-house test setup

I reran the IxChariot test and found...essentially the same performance. I really could not tell much of a difference between the back-to-back tests and the tests run with the MCA's connected as shown above. Figure 16 shows a receive/transmit test which is essentially identical to the upper traces in the direct-connected tests shown in Figure 10.

MoCA connection ping test
Click to enlarge image

Figure 16: MoCA connection ping test

I also ran a ping test, whose results are shown in Figure 17. Aside from the one 9 ms measurement, this looks just like the direct-connected results.

MoCA in-house connection ping test
Click to enlarge image

Figure 17: MoCA in-house connection ping test



Related Items:

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D-Link announces MoCA Coax Ethernet Networking kit
D-Link bringing MoCA bridge to retail soon
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MoCA 2.0 WiFi Adapter Announced. Good Luck Getting One

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Basement to Top Floor.

Overall rating: 
 
4.3
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Reviewed by Eric Bellomo
January 24, 2011
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I recently built a media server for my house, moving away from using disks all together. The main issue I had was that my server is in my basement and I'm using a WDTV Live Hub to view the content. I tired the Powerline Networking but since it can't jump the breakers so it didn't work. So i found these and they have hooked them up, they worked pretty much out of the box. Knock on wood I have not had a problem yet.

I stream Netflix and files that are about 1200kbs streaming to the WDTV Live Hub.