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You are here: LAN & WAN LAN & WAN Reviews HP PS1810-8G Switch Reviewed

HP PS1810-8G Switch Reviewed

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Introduction

HP PS1810-8G

At a Glance
Product HP PS1810-8G Switch [Website]
Summary 8-port Layer 2 Gigabit Smart Switch
Pros • Easy 802.1q VLAN configuration
• Power saving options
• Lifetime warranty
Cons • Odd shape if not paired with HP Server
• Limited Port-based VLAN flexibility
• Limited QoS features

Introduction

When I think of Hewlett-Packard (HP), I think of PCs and printers. However, HP has an extensive line of networking gear for small, medium and large enterprise networks. I'm going to look at the HP PS1810-8G switch in this review.

There are two models of the PS1810, an 8-port and a 24-port. The 8-port model, which is the focus of this review, is a bit unique in its shape, as it is designed to stack on top or underneath HP's ProLiant MicroServer Gen8 server, as shown below. The 24-port model is a more traditional network switch shape and has essentially the same functionality as the 8-port model.

HP Switch and Server

HP Switch and Server

HP pairs the PS1810-8G with the ProLiant MicroServer for both physical and technical reasons. A key feature of the PS1810-8G is auto-discovery and monitoring of HP Proliant Servers. Nevertheless, I tested the PS1810-8G in my network without a ProLiant server and found it to be a solid smart switch.

Physically, the PS1810-8G is square, measuring 9.06"(w) x 9.65"(d) x 1.73"(h). All eight Gigabit Ethernet ports are on the back of the device, as well as the power port and reset button, shown below.

back

Back

Ethernet port 1 of the PS1810-8G is a Power over Ethernet Powered Device (PoE PD) port, meaning you can power the PS1810-8G from another PoE switch. The HP PS1810-8G comes with an external power supply if you don't have a PoE switch. There is no cooling fan, so the switch is completely silent.

The front of the PS1810-8G, as mentioned, is designed to match the HP server, so it doesn't have any buttons or ports, as shown below.

front

Front

Under the covers is the main board, as shown below. As you can see the circuit board occupies only half of the inside of the case. If it wasn't designed to pair with the HP MicroServer, the switch could be quite a bit smaller! As you can see, there is only one key component, the switch, which is hidden under a heatsink that I didn't remove.

Main Board

Main Board

Configuration

There is an easy to read 100 page manual describing configurations on the PS1810-8G. But quite frankly, I didn't need it. The HP web-based menu is plain, which I prefer for simplicity, and I had no problem figuring out the configuration controls by simply looking at the menus.

I liked the status menu that provided a single place to go to view various conditions and configurations on the switch. Below is a screen shot showing the system description status page.

System Description

System Description

There are 11 menus, each with multiple sub-menus. In the table below, I've listed all the menus and sub-menus to give you an idea of the PS1810-8G's available configurations.

Menu tree

Menu tree



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