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I have a N66U and AC68U, at work and home respectively, and both on 380.63_2. When i log in at work it will says something like 30 clients (there's al...
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Hi,I recently started using a room on the 2nd floor as a work/study room. I am using a 1750 AC router with 3 antenas on the 1st floor.The rooter provi...
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DropboxDropbox airs some dirty laundry with their latest TOS update.

Dropbox continues to be a poster child for its Y-Combinator parents, but today maybe they will re-think using that poster. Dropbox has updated its TOS today to take into account a recent government mandate that Dropbox will turn over all your files if subpoenaed by the government, unencrypted.

Blogger Miguel de Icaza describes the issue with this in his recent blog post. Dropbox is not supposed to have access to your files, nor should anyone else. Per the Dropbox website:
• All transmission of file data occurs over an encrypted channel (SSL).
• All files stored on Dropbox servers are encrypted (AES-256).
• Dropbox employees aren't able to access user files, and when troubleshooting an account they only have access to file metadata (filenames, file sizes, etc., not the file contents).

Clearly someone at Dropbox has access to be able to comply with the new regulation, and I'm honestly unsurprised. For years people have been able to log into their personal Dropbox portal and download files synced into DB unencrypted without any special addons or clients. That means that the web server is able to decrypt the files before sending them, which means some automated process has access to the files if need be.

We're hoping Dropbox clears this up quickly, but in the mean time, I'd recommend checking out SugarSync. Dropbox still wins in security as it encrypts files before transmission, but overall SugarSync is cheaper, has more features, and is just as fast.

Over In The Forums

I have a N66U and AC68U, at work and home respectively, and both on 380.63_2. When i log in at work it will says something like 30 clients (there's al...
I get 8 IP addresses from my ISP Zen (FTTP) in the form xxx.xxx.xxx.8/29 The first is the network address, the last in the Broadcast address and the ...
I have got :No response to 10 echo requests and Time waiting for PADO packets among other things, I can't upload the log file for some reason!Anyone g...
Hi,I recently started using a room on the 2nd floor as a work/study room. I am using a 1750 AC router with 3 antenas on the 1st floor.The rooter provi...
Hello,I have just config my first NAS. Evrything is working perfect in ma LAN/WIFI network. But when I creaete domin and try hit FTP server from exter...