SmallNetBuilder

Follow SmallNetBuilder
Follow SmallNetBuilder on TwitterConnect On Facebook Google+Get the SmallNetBuilder RSS Feed
You are here: Wireless Wireless Reviews Buffalo Nfiniti Wireless-N High Power Router & Access Point Reviewed - Feature Tour

Buffalo Nfiniti Wireless-N High Power Router & Access Point Reviewed - Feature Tour

Print E-mail
<< Prev - Page 3 of 6 - Next >>

Feature Tour

Many of the features of the WZR-HP are standard features found on all routers, so I’ll comment briefly on unique features for each of the tabbed sections:

Setup – This tab provides easy access to a number of built-in wizards that can help assist you with configuration.  It also gives you a quick summary of your Internet connection as well as your wireless configuration.

Internet/LAN – This tab is a bit confusing, as there is also another tab named LAN Config.  However, options on this tab allow you to configure your Internet connection, set up Dynamic DNS (DynDNS or TZO), change your LAN and DHCP settings, enable/disable NAT, and create static routes.  The WZR-HP supports DHCP reservation, and you can change the DHCP lease period. 

One unique feature, also found in other legacy Buffalo routers, is a built in VPN server.  Using PPTP, the VPN server provides layer 2 access for up to 5 remote clients.  While PPTP is generally considered insecure and has been superseded by L2TP/IPSEC, it still is found in use because it’s easy to configure. 

All versions of Windows dating back to Windows 95 have a built-in PPTP client, as does Mac OS X.  For a home environment, it’s an easy and free way to set up a VPN.  Note that  the PPTP user list is a separate list from the user list for the NAS function.  Figure 8 shows the sub-tabs for the Internet/LAN tab as well as the PPTP configuration page.

PPTP VPN configuration

Figure 8: PPTP VPN configuration

Wireless Config – This tab allows you to configure virtually all wireless settings.  You can enable/disable the radio, change the operating channel or let the AirStation pick the best channel for you and disable SSID broadcast.  While all of these features are fairly standard, the WZR-HP has a unique “Multi-Security” feature that’s worth talking about (Figure 9).  When enabled, you can configure up to three wireless security profiles, each with a separate SSID and wireless security setting. 

Wireless Multi-security setup

Figure 9: Wireless Multi-security setup

But you don't have free reign for how you set wireless security for the three WLANs. For SSID1, you have a choice of WPA or WPA/WPA2, SSID2 supports WPA2/AES only and for SSID3, WEP is the only choice.  This allows you to have the security of WPA/WPA2, but also provides backwards compatibility with legacy wireless devices that only support WEP.  All three profiles connect to the single wired LAN and single DHCP server. Note that only the PSK forms of WPA are supported. If you need the Enterprise (RADIUS) version, you'll have to take a pass on the WZR-HP.

Checking the Separate Feature box in an SSID will block traffic between wireless clients only. The blocking works both for clients associated with the same SSID and also between SSIDs. Each WLAN, however, has free access to wired LAN clients. This means that if the weakest wireless security link, WEP, is compromised, all wired clients could be compromised.

While I like the multiple security feature, I think I prefer the “Guest” feature found in many D- Link routers.  The Guest WLAN feature allows you to provide wireless access on a separate VLAN that has access only to the Internet.

Security – There not too much to say about this tab.  The major feature found here is the ability to set up IP filtering rules.  Up to 32 rules are supported.

Lan Config – In this tab (Figure 10) you set up port forwarding to forward traffic from the Internet to a specific LAN IP address.  Ports for common services are pre-populated as shown.

Port Forwarding

Figure 10: Port Forwarding

The QoS sub-tab lets you set low, medium or high priority for various types of traffic (port based) being sent to the Internet only.  There is no downlink QoS, nor is there an automatic QoS feature like that found on most D-Link routers.

Other functions on this tab include setting up the IP address for the DMZ, enabling / disabling UPnP, and configuring the Movie Engine options.  Note:  you must enable the Movie Engine using the switch on the front panel – you can’t enable it through the web UI.




Related Items:

LAN Section
Contest #28 Results
Contest #26 Results
Contest #25 Results
Contest #29 Results

User reviews

View all user reviews

Average user rating from: 7 user(s)

NOTE! Please post product reviews from actual experience only.
Questions, review comments and opinions about products not based on actual use will not be published.

User Rating    [Back to Top]
Overall: 
 
4.1 Features :
 
4.9 Performance :
 
4.2 Reliability :
 
3.2
 
Ratings (the higher the better)
Features*
 
Performance*
 
Reliability*
 
Comments*
    Please enter the security code.
 
 

nfiniti giga

Overall rating: 
 
3.7
Features:
 
5.0
Performance:
 
5.0
Reliability:
 
1.0
Reviewed by david robinson
November 19, 2012
Report this review
 

I have had my nfiniti wireless router for almost two days. The first day I was able to use it for about 10 minutes. After that the red diagnosis light has been flashing and nothing else works. I have reset it twice to no avail. I have spent the rest of the last two days trying to find out something or anything about how to fix it. I found a help line, only $30 an hour to call, not bad considering I bought the router for $49. My final evaluation; rubbish, rubbish and rubbish. I have to wait another 2 weeks now for the electronics rubbish day to come round before I can throw it out. Oh how I hate you Buffalo.

 

European model

Overall rating: 
 
4.0
Features:
 
5.0
Performance:
 
3.0
Reliability:
 
4.0
Reviewed by Matt in the UK
May 11, 2012
Report this review
 

I am using the "user friendly" version of the firmware as I wanted to use the hardware switch to use this as an access point.

I have to say I am disappointed with the wireless strength from this router given that it is called "High Power". The wireless signal to my 802.11g devices (three Logitech Squeezeboxes) is is reported by the Logitech Media Server software at between 50% - 70% which is no higher than with the WiFi on my Netgear DG834GT router. That lacks 802.11n so at least my two laptops and one wireless desktop PC are seeing faster connections.

The difference from the one reviewed on this site turns out to be because the UK has much stricter emissions rules for routers than the US.

Over here, for 802.11n (40 MHz) we are limited to a maximum output of 200mW (20dBm) compared to in the USA where the maximum is 1000mW (30dBm).

I wonder if flashing with the US version of the User Friendly firmware will help? I would worry about bricking it though.

Looking at other reviews, this router / access point is not much higher in power than pretty well any other on sale. Therefore the use of "High Power" in the description is seriously misleading, at least in the UK.

Other than that it works well as an AP and gives me 4 extra Gigabit network ports which I really needed. Handy to have the multiple SSID facility too.

 

Not bad if you don't use the dd-wrt firmware

Overall rating: 
 
4.7
Features:
 
4.0
Performance:
 
5.0
Reliability:
 
5.0
Reviewed by DavidB
January 05, 2011
Report this review
 

Apparently dd-wrt uses a VERY OLD Atheros driver which has trouble with the chipset in this router. This is reportedly the cause of the many reports of wireless dropping off line with dd-wrt installed. Buffalo WAS shipping this model with dd-wrt pre-installed, but they no longer do so. I suspect that is due to how many people were returning units because of wireless dropping on a daily basis.

I dinged this router features down a notch because of the limitations of the USB NAS feature. Reviews state it is limited to 500GB (ridiculous in this age of sub-$100 2TB USB drives), plus the formatting tools in the firmware are very limited, not supporting larger than 32GB FAT32 partitions (yes, on a 500GB drive!) and not being able to format for XFS (which would at least give you >4GB file size support). That seems particularly strange since the router firmware specifically instructs you to format your USB drive XFS if you are having performance slowdowns when using the built in bittorrent function!

So far I've not had any problems with mine (up for a week now), but after seeing this review I think I will change to Channel 6 since it seems to output the highest power there (I currently am using Channel 11 since all my neighbors are on 6). I'm not having connection problems 2 levels up in my house, but I suspect the additional power will give me better throughput up there.

Thanks SNB for this most thorough review I've seen anywhere of this router.

 

awesome router

Overall rating: 
 
5.0
Features:
 
5.0
Performance:
 
5.0
Reliability:
 
5.0
Reviewed by Scott
January 04, 2011
Report this review
 

Despite the bad reviews from others, this is the best router I've ever owned. Sure, the factory firmware isn't as polished as others out there, but it's easy to use once you look around a little. Buffalo offers DD-WRT firmware as an option, but I ran back to back tests on two different physical routers, both with both firmwares, and proven pretty conclusively the Buffalo firmware is actually better performance-wise. People hate to hear that as they think the OEM is always crap, but it's true.

It has amazing range, good transmit speed, handles torrents just fine, and I don't have to reboot mine for weeks... There are some bells and whistles in the DD-WRT firmware that I wish the Buffalo one had, but oh well.

Some people just like to cry....

 

Mine came with DD-WRT installed, no problems so far

Overall rating: 
 
5.0
Features:
 
5.0
Performance:
 
5.0
Reliability:
 
5.0
Reviewed by Alex Atkin UK
November 18, 2010
Report this review
 

Despite negative reviews mine arrived with DD-WRT preinstalled and the only problem I have with it is that the wireless power will not go above 31mW. This supposedly is a problem specific to DD-WRT but as my house is quite small it is not a problem.

Maximum speed so far over WiFi has been around 7MB/s which is a vast improvement over the 2MB/s I got on 802.11g. There are also quite a few other WiFi connections around which could be preventing me from getting a higher speed, 802.11n will only attain top speeds with no other networks around on ANY router.

The feature list is too extensive to mention everything, just google for dd-wrt and you will see. My favourites though are the QoS which means web pages load fast even when maxing the connection for downloads. Its also shaved 10ms off my ping times over using my DG834GT as the router, which now is just sat in modem only mode.

The bandwidth speed and per day/month graphs are an excellent feature too. While my ISP does not have a usage limit, its still interesting to see how much I use, essential for anyone who does have a limit.

Overall, I am a little disappointed over the lack of high power WiFi with it being a selling point of this model, but its far more important to me that its a good reliable router which so far it has been. I have had none of the WiFi dropping or having to reboot problems people have reported, its been rock solid stable since I set it up. Will have to see how it copes when I finally get VDSL next year and it will be taxed a lot harder routing wise.

 
 
View all user reviews

Amazon Top-Selling Wireless Routers