Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Router Charts

Click for Router Charts

Router Ranker

Click for Router Ranker

NAS Charts

Click for NAS Charts

NAS Ranker

Click for NAS Ranker

More Tools

Click for More Tools

Security Reviews

Unified Threat Management: Two Extremes

At the top of this piece, I said that Yoggie is the second "UTM" device that I've reviewed. So let's compare the two. Table 2 summarizes the ways that the D-Link DSD-150 and Yoggie Gatekeepr Pro differ.

Feature D-Link DSD-150 Yoggie Gatekeeper Pro
System Components Backend,
Gateway Hardware,
Client Software
Backend,
Gateway Hardware,
Client Software
Minimum Configuration Backend,
Gateway Hardware,
Client Software
Backend,
Gateway Hardware
Delay Between
Install and Full Protection
Approximately 24 hrs 0
Portability Low High
PC Speed Impact High Low
Cross Platform? Windows Only "Almost" Platform Neutral
Enterprise IT Value Low High
Table 2: D-Link/Yoggie Comparison

System Components: The D-Link DSD-150 is a client-PC-based software product. It starts out with a small 300K client on each PC. But, after install, while you are not looking, it slips 20 MB of client software from its back end over the Internet and on to each client. This large software library then talks with the DSD-150's hardware gateway to protect client computers.

Minimum Configuration: The Yoggie Gatekeeper Pro is an in-line Linux firewall in a USB-key size that also has backend and client-PC system components. However, the Yoggie can be used, all by itself, out of the box, to protect a laptop in a hotel. Yoggie provides immediate protection up to its capabilities. But the D-Link system needs all three system components in-place to work, which typically take a day to download.

Portability: The D-Link isn't really portable. It is designed to be built into a SOHO LAN. The Yoggie Gatekeeper Pro is portable. The main mission-critical burning need that Yoggie addresses is to protect laptops in hostile environments.

PC Speed Impact: Because the D-Link relies on large client-based programs to protect, it causes a substantial degradation in computer speed. Because Yoggie performs the vast majority of filtering tasks off the client, it does not degrade PC performance as much. The risk with Yoggie is that it won't be able to keep up with incoming packets, but in my testing I did not sense any bottlenecking from the Gatekeeper appliance.

Cross Platform: I rate the Yoggie Gatekeeper as "almost" platform neutral. The one barrier between Yoggie's current product and platform neutrality is the software padlocking the user into using the Gatekeeper Pro. There is no Mac or Ubuntu program that shuts off Internet access if the Gatekeeper appliance is not plugged in to the computer. While some business users can be expected to always remember to plug in their Yoggie appliance, your kids might "forget".

Enterprise IT Value: D-Link isn't enterprise oriented. The Yoggie Gatekeeper pro provides automatic logging of client PC activity, and the automatic log transfers back to the mother-ship, in its enterprise versions.

Finally, the D-Link DSD-150 and Yoggie Gatekeeper Pro differ in where the majority of security protection work is done. Table 3 shows that D-Link does most of its work on the backend and on the client PC. Very little is actually done in the DSD-150 itself.

Activity On-Backend On-Appliance On-PC
Intrusion Detection 45% 10% 45%
Email Spam Filtering 45% 10% 45%
Porn Filtering 45% 10% 45%
Download Filtering 45% 10% 45%
Spyware Filtering 45% 10% 45%
Virus Filtering 45% 10% 45%
Phishing Filtering 45% 10% 45%
Firewalling 45% 10% 45%
Web-Ad Filtering 45% 10% 45%
Table 3: What Does the Heavy Lifting? DSD-150

Table 4 shows that Yoggie splits its work pretty evenly between the backend and the appliance itself. The exception is Kaspersky, splitting spyware and virus filtering between the PC and the backend.

Activity Backend Appliance On-PC Package
Intrusion Detection 50% 49% 1% Snort
Email Spam Filtering 50% 49% 1% MailShell
Porn Filtering 50% 49% 1% SurfControl
Download Filtering        
Spyware Filtering 50%   50% Kaspersky
Virus Filtering 50%   50% Kaspersky
Phishing Filtering 50% 49% 1% MailShell
Firewalling   99% 1%  
Web-Ad Filtering 50% 49% 1% SurfControl
Table 4: What Does the Heavy Lifting? Yoggie Gatekeeper Pro

More Stuff

Wi-Fi System Tools
Check out our Wi-Fi System Charts, Ranker and Finder!

Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Over In The Forums

Hi,The 2.4 GHZ wifi is down even if I enable radio under Wireless/Professional.I tried factory resets, different ASUS stock firmware and different Mer...
I've got a question/topic for discussion that is interesting to/bothering me:Why does Entware co-opt the entire "/opt" folder, being that it is just a...
I have an ASUS RT-N66U with Merlin 380.70, the last version for this router. My Rogers package is 150Mbps. My old Dell laptop was getting ~80Mbps. I b...
Called the Philippines to get my router set up as I have a PPOE connection and VLAN 35 to setup VLAN TO WAN SUPPORT for my Bell Canada Home Hub 3000 1...
How can i get IKEV2 IPsec server up and running?I can see only IKEV1 under IPsec advancedThanks

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3