Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Router Charts

Click for Router Charts

Router Ranker

Click for Router Ranker

NAS Charts

Click for NAS Charts

NAS Ranker

Click for NAS Ranker

More Tools

Click for More Tools

Wireless Features

A recent Forum post reported what appeared to be a bug involving the NETGEAR WNDR3700 and Intel 5300 WiFi Link mini PCIe client. The gist of the problem was that the reader could only get a 54 Mbps maximum connection rate between the two products in both the 2.4 and 5 GHz bands. But connecting the same notebook (with Intel 5300) to a Trendnet TEW-672GR 802.11n router yielded the expected 300 Mbps link rate (with 40 MHz mode enabled).

The reader later reported that enabling WMM on each radio, which he had previously disabled while setting up the router, immediately allowed the Intel 5300 client to link to the WNDR3700 at the same 300 Mbps rate provided by the Trendnet router.

Since I was unaware of any relationship between WMM and supported link rate, I reported the problem to NETGEAR as an possible bug. But after consulting with Atheros (maker of the WNDR3700's wireless chipset), Intel and even the Wi-Fi Alliance, NETGEAR reported that the behavior found by the reader was normal!

I've seen recommendations from users to disable WMM in 11n routers to either improve performance or fix problems. So I asked NETGEAR for an explanation of why WMM is required to enable link rates higher than 54 Mbps. They sent along an explanation from Atheros, which I'm paraphrasing below.

Basically, the 802.11n spec requires devices to support 802.11e (Quality of Service [QoS] enhancements for wireless LAN) in order to use HT (High Throughput) link rates, i.e. higher than 54 Mbps. (WMM is a subset of 802.11e that was created by the Wi-Fi Alliance as a stop-gap measure while 802.11e made its way slowly through the IEEE review process.) WMM's Traffic Identifier (TID) field is key to aggregation mechanisms, including block acknowledgement (block ACK), that enable 802.11n's high throughput rates.

Since WMM support is required for products to be certified for 802.11n, WMM comes enabled by default in all Wi-Fi Certified n APs and wireless routers. So even if you don't have any WMM-aware devices on your network, leave WMM enabled or you may find your clients connecting only at 54 Mbps rates.

More Wireless

Zyxel logo

Is Cloud-Based Network Management Right for You? - Cloud managed networks aren't just for Enterprises anymore.

Wi-Fi System Tools
Check out our Wi-Fi System Charts, Ranker and Finder!

Featured Sponsors



Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Over In The Forums

Hello All,Our small company is expanding, maybe i should start visiting mediumnetbuilders.com more often We will be expanding in to the building next...
Version 3.0.0.4.384.327382018/08/21 45.38 MBytesASUS RT-AC5300 Firmware version 3.0.0.4.384.32738AiMesh new features- Supported creating mesh system ...
People are recommending layer 3 lite switches. What is a layer 3 lite switch? What is it's layer 3 capabilities?I would like to put a definition to th...
Hello, everyone!I have googled for the answer for quite a while, but haven't found anything. Hope you can help me.I have ASUS RT-AC68U (White, if this...
View attachment 14173‚Äč Devolo announced its Magic Wi-Fi system last week at IFA 2018.The system pairs dual-band Wi-Fi access points with second-Gener...

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3