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Wi-Fi System

These benchmarks measure up and downlink 2.4 and 5 GHz throughput at each system node, by "walking" the octoScope Pal dual-band test client from node to node. Since tests are made with 0 dB attenuation between the Pal test client and each system node, all measurements are best case. As signal levels between system node and client drop (i.e. distance increases), throughput will decrease proportionate to the RvR curves above.

These tests are highly influenced by what's happening in the backhaul in each node. Focus on the 5 GHz results in particular, since from the RvR results, we know EnMesh can deliver at least 450 Mbps on the root node with no backhaul involved.

The 2.4 GHz downlink chart shows throughput measured at each node, with the A bars being the root node, B bars the Hop 1 node and C bars the Hop 2 node. EnMesh is the weakest performer except for the Root node (A) case. Keep in mind Deco is using 40 MHz bandwidth while Google and EnMesh are using 20 MHz.

Wi-Fi System Performance - 2.4 GHz downlink

Wi-Fi System Performance - 2.4 GHz downlink

EnMesh holds its own against Google Wifi on 2.4 GHz uplink connected to Root and Hop 1, but falls back for Hop 2.

Wi-Fi System Performance - 2.4 GHz uplink

Wi-Fi System Performance - 2.4 GHz uplink

5 GHz downlink levels the playing field with all products using 80 MHz bandwidth. But it doesn't help EnMesh rise to the top of the field, since it trails the two other products in all three tests.

Wi-Fi System Performance - 5 GHz downlink

Wi-Fi System Performance - 5 GHz downlink

5 GHz uplink also shows EnMesh turning in the poorest performance.

Wi-Fi System Performance - 5 GHz uplink

Wi-Fi System Performance - 5 GHz uplink

Capacity

Our Wi-Fi System capacity test uses three 2x2 AC clients, one connected to each node of three node systems. Traffic is then run to all three clients simultaneously and throughput measured for each traffic pair. A 2.4 GHz client is connected to the root node and 5 GHz to the others.

The Capacity bar chart shows total throughput for the three test clients in each direction. Since previous tests have shown low backhaul capacity, I didn't expect EnMesh to do very well in this test and it didn't. It came in dead last for uplink and second to last for downlink.

Wi-Fi System Capacity

Wi-Fi System Capacity

The next plots compare EnMesh, Google Wifi and TP-Link Deco at each node. Results are about what you'd expect, given the previous results. The main surprise here is that Deco does so poorly for Case C, which is the second 5 GHz client connected to the Hop 2 mesh node.

Wi-Fi System Capacity by Test Case - downlink

Wi-Fi System Capacity by Test Case - downlink

Uplink finally gives EnMesh one win for Case C.

Wi-Fi System Capacity by Test Case - uplink

Wi-Fi System Capacity by Test Case - uplink

We can also see throughput changes over the course of the tests. The downlink plot shows steady throughput for all three streams, which is a good thing. Root node has the highest throughput and Hop 1 and 2 have about the same.

Wi-Fi System Capacity vs. time - Downlink

Wi-Fi System Capacity vs. time - Downlink

Uplink is more interesting in that Root node throughput is significantly lower, tracking with Hop 1, which shows occasional jumps into higher throughput territory. The main takeaway is that there is no evidence of bandwidth adjustment throughout the 30 minute test period.

Wi-Fi System Capacity vs. time - Uplink

Wi-Fi System Capacity vs. time - Uplink

Closing Thoughts

EnGenius' EnMesh is not an attractive choice for Wi-Fi System shoppers. Coming in at #9 in our Wi-Fi System Ranker, there are plenty of better performing products above it. Even if you sort by price, TP-Link's Deco M5 at around $240 and ranked at #8 would be a better choice than EnMesh, which is currently around $266. And then there are Google Wi-Fi and wall-plugged Orbi mini, which are also less expensive and higher ranked.

The only advantages EnMesh has are its storage sharing and Wi-Fi controls available via its web GUI. But for most shoppers, those pros are not going to be enough to make the sale over much more established products with better brand name recognition.

 

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