Bad Links? Do This

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Tim Higgins

There is a problem with old style links that is preventing access to multi-page articles. The work-around until we get this fixed is to click on the article title at the top of the article. This will give you a new-style URL that will allow you access to all article pages. Sorry for the problem and we hope to get this fixed soon.

Related posts

Wideband WLANs on the way?

The final standard is still over a year in the future and the Wi-Fi certification process for draft 11n products is about 3-5 months away. But companies are continuing to put this Beta-test-in-progress (which you, the consumer, are paying to participate in) into end-products beyond wireless routers and adapters. We've already seen draft 11n integrated into notebooks, and now Apple and D-Link have integrated it into networked media players.

The AppleTV announcement revealed that draft 11n capable hardware (from Atheros, it turns out) had already been integrated into existing Core 2 Duo MacBooks, MacBook Pros and Core 2 Duo iMacs (except the 17-inch, 1.83GHz iMac). All you need to do is run an "enabler" app, buy a new version of the Airport Extreme (in new Mac mini form factor) and voila, you have an interference generator for your 11b/g network. But something that Apple has done right is to put concurrent (or simultaneous) dual-band capability into its draft 11n products. This raises the cost, but also the flexibility since connections in both bands can be made at the same time.

Misusing MIMO

As is too often the case, yet another networking term that initially had clear meaning has been grabbed by the marketeers and is being used to lure gullible buyers.

Slurpr: Cool black box or jail bait?

Dutch hacker, Mark Hoekstra, has unveiled his latest project—the Slurpr. It's a router that can connect to six wireless networks simultaneously and channel the aggregated bandwidth into a private LAN.