Linksys Range Plus is Draft 11n in Disguise

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Tim Higgins

Yes, as you might expect, it appears that Draft 802.11n is actually used in the products. The FCC report for the WRT100 router shows test results for both 20 and 40 MHz Draft 802.11n OFDM modes, including spectral plots.

So why not say so? My guess is that one of the reasons might be to avoid price erosion of Linksys’ Draft 11n products. After all, if you can get the benefits of Draft 11n for a hundred bucks, why pay more?

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The Gotcha in Draft 11n Wi-Fi Certification

My previous post describing the D-Link DIR-655 / DWA-652's failure to switch from 40 MHz to 20 MHz channel mode when encountering a legacy WLAN, might be counter to what D-Link says is the expected behavior. But I have found that it is neither a violation of IEEE Draft 2.0 nor the Alliance's Draft 2.0 11n Certification.

Since that post, I've exchanged emails with D-Link and spoken with both Atheros and the Wi-Fi Alliance to try to find out how the D-Link products could not be performing as D-Link had described, yet receive Wi-Fi Draft 2.0 11n Certification.