Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Router Charts

Click for Router Charts

Router Ranker

Click for Router Ranker

NAS Charts

Click for NAS Charts

NAS Ranker

Click for NAS Ranker

More Tools

Click for More Tools

LAN & WAN Features

Conclusion

I had already devised a contingency plan, should things slow to down to a point which I deemed unacceptable. By limiting the number of machines connected to each switch, I decreased the likelihood of traffic getting jammed on a high-demand node.

Each 5324 has 24 gigabit Ethernet ports. So you could theoretically connect 24 machines to each switch. This wouldn’t be taking into account, however, the high volume scenario which, combined with backups, would likely slow network responsiveness enough to make me look bad. (And you never get the second chance to make a first impression.)

The Contingency Plan.

Figure 4: The Contingency Plan.

So by connecting fewer (in this case, five) machines to each switch and terminating each switch into its own separate server NIC, I reduced the chance of network congestion when things got “heavy.” (Figure 4 shows how ten production clients with two workstations each were connected to this network. Note that each fileserver also had a built-in NIC up front to connect to the domain controller switch, bringing the total to five NICs.)

But just how heavy would things get? It is entirely possible that I could've gotten away with ten or more clients per switch and spread out the switches a bit more once I connected the office personnel. What kind of load should I have been anticipating in this particular scenario? What exactly was the breaking point and would I ever even come close to reaching it? And finally, what was the most effective way to route traffic to minimize delays and maximize network stability?

The answers to this and more in Part Two…

More LAN & WAN

Wi-Fi System Tools
Check out our Wi-Fi System Charts, Ranker and Finder!

Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Over In The Forums

I have a problem with IPv6 DNS: I am using Comcast via an ASUS RT-AC86U router with IPv6 enabled. On my LAN I have a Pi-hole on a Raspberry Pi 3B+ and...
Hi all,I have CL GPON fiber with the RT AC86U router connected to the ONT. I am connected using PPPoE & VLAN set to 201. I had a previous line speed o...
Hi there.I have an ASUS RT-AC66U_B1.For some reason, I have extremely slow page loads in the router's GUI since I updated the firmware to 384.12Is the...
Lots of invalid token freed, are these normal?Jul 15 22:29:15 kernel: FPM Pool 0: invalid token 0x00958000 freedJul 15 22:32:03 kernel: FPM Pool 0: in...
I just read this blog article https://www.privateinternetaccess.c...celeration-is-here-for-routers-using-openvpn/ which was very interesting.This is t...

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3