New! Hardware Router Charts Go Interactive

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Tim Higgins

Router Charts Go Interactive

The Hardware Router Chart has been such a success, that we’ve revamped it to make it even more useful. We’ve basically leveraged the database-driven charting engine used over at TomsHardware, but customized it for the different requirements that routers have.

We now have four charts to help you figure out the router that’s best for you. The new charts, plus our recently-updated Hardware Router Need To Know 2006, provide the best router selection guide you’ll find anywhere!

So What’s New?

The single chart was getting a bit dense and confusing with trying to display three different throughput results. So we’ve separated it into three separate charts:

  • WAN to LAN Throughput
  • LAN to WAN throughput
  • Total Simultaneous throughput

We also figured that the WLAN, GbE and QoS checkbox columns were kind of lame, so we created a new Router Product Feature Table that should be much more helpful for router selection.

You can access the updated charts here.

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