Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Router Charts

Click for Router Charts

Router Ranker

Click for Router Ranker

NAS Charts

Click for NAS Charts

NAS Ranker

Click for NAS Ranker

More Tools

Click for More Tools

NAS How To

Repacking and Check Out

Now we'll need to put everything back together. First we need to compress the RAM disk file :

gzip -9 ramdisk

You should end up with a ramdisk.gz file. Next, we need to build the final Flash image using the pack parameter to splitnslu:

./splitnslu pack newflash.bin

This will give a few lines of status and then complete, creating a new Flash called newflash.bin. For assurance sake, compare the size of your new image with the size of the original image :

ls -l *.bin

You should see that both the original image and the new image are the same size.

We are ready to burn our new image to the NSLU2. This is the most critical part of the process. Up to now we haven't modified anything on the box itself. If you take this step, you take the risk of killing the box if the edits were made incorrectly.

We'll use the standard Linksys menus to install the Flash. First, using a browser, go the Administration web page of the NSLU2. Under Administration select Advanced, then Upgrade. Select the "Choose File" button and find your new Flash: newflash.bin. Then on the bottom of the page, select "Start Upgrade".

When a menu appears, take a deep breath and select "OK". At this point you should see the LEDs flickering on the box as the burn occurs. Eventually you'll get a pop-up indicating that the system is going to reboot. Select "OK". After a nervous minute or so, you should hear a single "beep" indicating that the box has booted normally. Whew! We've done it.

Now, enable telnet by executing the standard Management/telnet.cgi script discussed in my previous articles. Telnet in and take a look at the /etc/rc.d directory. You should see your new rc.hook script. Let's try it out. It's set up to execute our script /share/hdd/conf/rc.d/rc.custom which doesn't yet exist, so we'll create it. For starters, just put a test in it to verify that it works. I put the following in mine :

#!/bin/sh
/usr/bin/Set_Led beep1

Mark it executable, and then execute it through the rc.hook script to make sure it works:

chmod +x /share/hdd/conf/rc.d/rc.custom
/etc/rc.d/rc.hook

You should hear a "beep". Now reboot :

reboot

After a minute or so you should hear the standard first beep followed a few seconds later by our second beep. It works! We have a permanent hook on disk to start up our own processes.

More NAS

Wi-Fi System Tools
Check out our Wi-Fi System Charts, Ranker and Finder!

Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Over In The Forums

Running 384_12 (latest stable) on an AC88 with Diversion & Skynet with 2GB swap file. Had a crash (early in the morning hours with no load):kernel: Ou...
Hello,I want to access one of my home devices with a LAN connection from my cell when I am outside. I tried using my Asus RT-AC88U's original firmware...
Hi, just got the subject error while running a 'robocopy' backup script against a samba shared drive on my rt-ax88u. I am not posting this in the alph...
Hi do anyone know is there difference when the aimesh node logo turn blue or just normal color?It is because i always lost my aimesh node (lost connec...
Ramblings of an Old Man … RuckusWhere else can an old man ramble on about computers and networks? (My wife tolerates it only to the point that it puts...

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3