Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Router Charts

Click for Router Charts

Router Ranker

Click for Router Ranker

NAS Charts

Click for NAS Charts

NAS Ranker

Click for NAS Ranker

More Tools

Click for More Tools

NAS Reviews

Introduction

At a Glance
Product D-Link MediaLounge DSM-G600 Wireless G Network Storage Enclosure
Summary Wireless enabled BYOD NAS enclosure with Gigabit Ethernet and UPnP AV server
Pros • Gigabit Ethernet support
• Functions as 11g AP or client
• Includes UPnP AV server
Cons • No print server
• No FTP or HTTP file access
• Noisy fan
• No backup features
5 April 2006 Editor's Note: This review describes the RevA version of the product, which was provided for review by D-Link. A more recent RevB version is also available.

Introduction

There are a lot of consumer-level Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices on the market these days, and over the last year or so I've had the chance to try out quite a few. Most of them are designed to be hooked into a 100 Mbps wired network, and are typically used by other computers on the network for sharing and backing up data. However, with 1000 Mbps (Gigabit) networks becoming common, and more and more people having wireless networks in their home, maybe there's room for some additional network flexibility.

In this review, I'll be taking a look at an NAS product from D-Link that's a network "jack of all trades". The DSM-G600 supports 10, 100 and 1000 Mbps networks, and in addition, it supports wireless networks as either a client or an access point. And to top it all off, it has a built-in multimedia server to dish up music, movies and images to other devices on your network.

The front of the DSM-G600 has a row of status LEDs and a power button. On the back there's a single antenna, a network port, a fan vent, a reset button and two USB ports (see Figure 1).

Figure 1: DS-G600 Back Plate

Figure 1: DS-G600 Back Plate

Since the G600 is a "bring-your-own-disk" NAS device, a single 3.5" ATA/IDE drive must be installed before it can be used. Installing the disk is fairly simple, but also a little bit awkward - the power and IDE cable are positioned on the sides of the disk cage rather than on the end where they need to connect to the drive.

The device can operate wirelessly, but the documentation stated that initial configuration needed to be done over a wired network. For this reason, after my drive was in, I connected power and a network cable. When I powered the unit up, the fan immediately came on and was quite loud. I hoped that the fan was thermostatically controlled and thus would eventually turn off, but that was not the case - it runs continuously.

More NAS

Wi-Fi System Tools
Check out our Wi-Fi System Charts, Ranker and Finder!

Featured Sponsors



Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Over In The Forums

Ahamed Nafeez said his VORACLE attack works against VPN services that use the highly regarded OpenVPN protocol (or similar protocols) by default and a...
Thinking about upgrading the RT-N66U and was wondering what you guys think I should go to. Currently run a 200 mbps connection hardwire, but WiFi on 5...
Hi,So I have a new NAS coming which will be connected to an AiMesh Node (RT-AC5300). Also directly connected to the same node are the devices most com...
So I've got my Samba Network Place set up through USB 3.0 on the AC3100. I can copy files onto the drive and view the files, watch on the media server...
I finally got the OpenVPN Server on my RT-88U router to host my Chromebook (ASUS C300) now that I'm running Merlin V384.6. That Chromebook does not (y...

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3