Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Router Charts

Click for Router Charts

Router Ranker

Click for Router Ranker

NAS Charts

Click for NAS Charts

NAS Ranker

Click for NAS Ranker

More Tools

Click for More Tools

NAS Reviews

Introduction

Updated 6/3/2009 Corrected SODIMM slot info.

QNAP TS-439 Pro

At a Glance
Product QNAP Turbo NAS (TS-439 Pro)
Summary Four-drive server-like Intel Atom-based BYOD NAS with support for single drives, JBOD and RAID 0, 1, 5, 5+ hot spare and 6.
Pros • Online volume expansion and RAID migration
• iSCSI target
• Local console and remote SSH root access
• Built-in LAMP server, DLNA multimedia server, FTP, iTunes
• Fast attached backup to USB and eSATA drives
Cons • Relatively expensive

QNAP's TS-439 Pro is a four bay version of its six-bay TS-639 Pro. I have told the QNAP story many times now, so I'll just do a quick review of the 439's physical features then go right to Performance.

The 439 Pro looks like a slimmer 639 due to two fewer drive bays. Otherwise, as the opening photo shows, the two products are essentially the same. Figure 1 shows the front and rear panel details. The 439 has one large[r] case fan vs. the 639's two smaller. Both have the same power supply fan. Port complement is the same, right down to the VGA connector for an attached root console.

Front and Rear Panels

Figure 1: Front and Rear Panels

Internal Details

Figure 2 shows a view of the 439 from the top with the cover removed. The layout is a bit tighter than the 639's due to the reduced case width. The power supply is easily accessible and, contrary to my observation in the 639 review, the single case fan can be replaced without dropping the back panel. The four screws thread into the fan frame and there is enough space to slide the fan out (after disconnecting the cable) without having to drop the rear panel.

TS-439 Pro top inside view
Click to enlarge image

Figure 2: TS-439 Pro top inside view
Updated 6/3/2009 Corrected SODIMM slot info.

I started to remove the board, but halfway through realized that it's the same board as in the 639 based on the Intel N270 Atom clocked at 1.6 GHz, with one SODIMM socket holding 1 GB of DDRII 667 RAM. This single board does double duty since the single Marvell 88SX7042 PCI-e 4-port SATA-II interface is mounted directly on the backplane.

With four Samsung HE103UJ 1 TB drives provided by QNAP with the review unit spun up, the 439's power consumption measured 55 W. With the drives spun down for power saving, wattage dropped to 27W. Like the 639, the 439 was surprisingly quiet in operation, although drive noise was definitely noticeable during performance testing.

More NAS

Wi-Fi System Tools
Check out our Wi-Fi System Charts, Ranker and Finder!

Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Over In The Forums

Hi Knowledgeable People.I have a number of IoT things on my network now - lifx lights, sonoff power devices, Robot Vac, IP Cam's, Garage Door opener e...
Hey everyone!This is my first post, so please bare with me. I've tried doing this on my own, but I think I'm either over doing something or have done ...
Hello all,I have an RT-AC68U where I have setup an OpenVPN server. The problem is now, I have a set of IPs from outside trying to connect (obviously n...
I'm having a reoccurring issue where wireless devices are being assigned a wrong IP/DNS address. Wireless devices still connect to the 2.4 or the 5ghz...
Netgear just released 1.0.2.60 No idea if it fixes the issues related to 1.0.2.58. https://kb.netgear.com/000060335/R7800-Firmware-Version-1-0-2-60

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3