Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Router Charts

Click for Router Charts

Router Ranker

Click for Router Ranker

NAS Charts

Click for NAS Charts

NAS Ranker

Click for NAS Ranker

More Tools

Click for More Tools

Wireless Features

D-Link DAP-1522 and 1555

Last week's announcement of a new lower-cost DAP-1522 dual-band draft 802.11n AP/bridge from D-Link could bring dual-band draft 11n within the reach of more consumers. Although it lists for $119.99, at least one online retailer is already advertising a price under $100. So I hit the FCC ID filings to see how D-Link managed to knock $100 off the list price of the 1522's predecessor, the DAP-1555.

The DAP-1555's design (Figure 1) is similar to the D-Link's single-radio DGL-4500 router [reviewed]. (You can bring up a photo of the DGL-4500's innards here.)

Both use Ubicom processors (which provide their automatic uplink QoS features), Atheros mini-PCI radio modules and include 4 port switches. The 4500's is gigabit (via a Realtek RTL8356), while the 1555's is 10/100, provided by a Marvell 88E6061.

DAP-1555 inside
Click to enlarge image

Figure 1: DAP-1555 inside

But the 1522 is based on an entirely different platform (Figure 2), using both a Ralink SoC processor (RT2880F), which includes the draft 11n MAC / Baseband processing, and dual-band draft 802.11n 2T3R (2 transmit, 3 receive channels) transceiver (RT2850L). The 1522 has a four-port gigabit switch, which comes from a Realtek RTL8366, instead of the 1555's 10/100 switch.

WPN824 v3 board
Click to enlarge image

Figure 2: DAP-1522 board

One of the advantages of the Ubicom processors is the StreamEngine automatic QoS feature, which automatically classifies packets flowing through the router (or in this case, bridge), giving priority to audio and video streams. Figure 3 shows the 1555's WISH (Wireless Intelligent Stream Handling) controls.

DAP-1555 WISH (auto QoS)
Click to enlarge image

Figure 3: DAP-1555 WISH (auto QoS)

D-Link appears to not be ready to give up automatic QoS with its switch to Ralink. Figure 4 shows the QoS configuration page from the DAP-1522's manual, which appears to also have an Automatic setting. It will be interesting to see how automatic Ralink's QoS really is.

DAP-1522 QoS
Click to enlarge image

Figure 4: DAP-1522 QoS

Maybe breaking the $100 price barrier is D-Link's way of getting consumers' minds off the continued unavailability of dual-band dual-radio DIR-855, which, if it ever ships, will cost almost 3 times as much. At any rate, I've asked D-Link for a DAP-1522 for review, so that I can see if it will be a decent way for you to upgrade to dual-band draft 11n.

More Wireless

Zyxel logo

Wi-Fi Mesh System Secrets - Here's how to get the most out of your whole home mesh WiFi system.

Wi-Fi System Tools
Check out the new Wi-Fi System Charts, Ranker and Finder!

Featured Sponsors



Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Over In The Forums

Hey All,I built a house last year and ran cat6 everywhere. I installed a Unifi AC Lite in the ceiling of the living room, which is central to the hous...
I have 2 RT-AC68U's with running Firmware Version:384.5. One is set up as Media Bridge the other is in AP Mode.The one running in Media Bridge mode is...
From my research, terminals (keystone jacks or patch panels) that have angled IDC's are Krone. Ones with perpendicular/straight IDC's are 110 and othe...
‚Äč ASUS Lyra Trio's three-stream approach to mesh Wi-Fi fails to impress.Read on SmallNetBuilder
It looks like Spectrum (Charter) cable is readying a 4x4 802.11ax wireless router to provide to certain customers who choose to pay a monthly fee for ...

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3