Like every other website on the planet, SmallNetBuilder uses cookies. Our cookies track login status, but we only allow admins to log in anyway, so those don't apply to you. Any other cookies you pick up during your visit come from advertisers, which we don't control.
If you continue to use the site, you agree to tolerate our use of cookies. Thank you!

Router Charts

Click for Router Charts

Router Ranker

Click for Router Ranker

NAS Charts

Click for NAS Charts

NAS Ranker

Click for NAS Ranker

More Tools

Click for More Tools

NAS How To

Introduction

Figure 1: The Linksys NSLU2

When I first read the review of the new Linksys Network Storage Unit device (NSLU2) I was definitely interested. It looked to be small, silent, inexpensive and flexible enough to provide backup and file storage to my network.

My only concerns were reports that it would only work with Microsoft Windows and that it formatted its disks with a proprietary filesystem . But throwing caution to the wind, I found a deal on the web, ordered it and a couple of days later, it arrived in the mail.

After I hooked up an external drive, connected to it with my web browser and configured it using the web interface, the NSLU2 was serving files on my home network in no time. Despite Linksys' documentation to the contrary, using it with MacOS X and Linux was no problem, since both operating systems support the Microsoft SMB file server protocol used by the box. Installation complete, right? Wrong. I was just getting started.

As nice as this tiny silent unit was, I couldn't leave well-enough alone. I knew it had more potential since internally the little box ran Linux. With dual USB 2.0 ports and a 10/100 Ethernet connection, this little box has many possibilities. How about NFS along with SMB ? Or maybe a print server to go with the file storage?

Using a USB/Serial converter I could use my X10 interface unit to do some simple home automation. A USB/Ethernet converter could turn the unit into a little router, or a USB/802.11bg converter could create a wireless access point. Full control of the USB ports would really open up new possibilities, but how to get into it?

NOTE!Disclaimer: It goes without saying, but I'll say it anyway. Exploring the NSLU2 by looking at its internal file structures using any method that doesn't modify its code should leave your warranty intact. But modifying the NSLU2 in any way will void your warranty.

SmallNetBuilder, Pudai LLC and I are not responsible for any damage that the information in this article may cause to your NSLU2 or any data it manages.

So download a copy of the current firmware before you start, and don't go trying to get help from Linksys if you break it.

More NAS

Wi-Fi System Tools
Check out our Wi-Fi System Charts, Ranker and Finder!

Support Us!

If you like what we do and want to thank us, just buy something on Amazon. We'll get a small commission on anything you buy. Thanks!

Over In The Forums

Hi!I recently bought used RT-N16 with intention to replace firmware with OpenWRT to later get it running in my dorm, which has 802.1x eduroam authenti...
say, what are people using here ?? Default message log levelLog only messages more urgent thanmy log was full of dhcp, and everything else.what would ...
So, my Asus RT-AC1300UHP has been behaving weirdly lately. This has been happening for the last two days. Suddenly, my connected mobile phones will sh...
I have an NFS mount on a router running 380.70 with no issues - NFS is running by default. Further info below (tried to edit/delete this post for chan...
I see a difference here in my bridge 192.168.1.15, which in connected to an access point 192.168.1.11Why the difference in transmission rates?View att...

Don't Miss These

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3